• Precision Ag Reviews

Ep. 34: Rantizo’s Systems Approach to Drones in Agriculture with Michael Ott and Ken Rost


Have you ever had a weed breakout in a field that you couldn’t get to with a sprayer? What about an insect issue or micronutrient deficiency? I know, on our farm, we have a problem patch of weeds that is too small and too late in the season to justify coming in with a regular field sprayer – it can feel like you’ve run out of options (other than hoeing the field manually). However, in Episode 34 of Precision Points, I sat down with the leaders of Rantizo, a company that is expanding growers’ management choices by leveraging autonomous drones and easy-to-use software for aerial applications.


In this conversation with Michael Ott, CEO of Rantizo, and Ken Rost, a contractor who is in the field spraying with Rantizo’s system, we learn who Rantizo is, how growers are using its technology today and how they plan to use it in the future.


How does Rantizo work?


Rantizo starts with a systems approach. They consider what the grower needs, what agronomists recommend, what works for ag retailers and how the equipment can work to deliver applications.


“The farmer is ultimately the end customer, and they want precise application – where things are needed and when they're needed,” Michael said. “So they need fertilizer, but they don't need too much; they don't want too little. You always have to kind of ‘Goldilocks’ it. And when you have a system that can go out, like a drone, and fly in pretty much any weather, you can be very, very precise with it.”


When it comes time to fly and apply, Ken shares that it's a pretty simple process. The controllers for the drones accept shape files and fly on an automated process. The hard work happens before you fly, when you try to determine what application needs to be completed out in the field.


“Say, for instance, you're looking for some herbicide-resistant weeds out there and you want to do a spot treatment with the drone. There has to be intelligence, either artificial or non-artificial, that's going to identify those areas that need to be applied, and that's where I think more development work is continuing,” said Ken.


How are drones used for application?


Applying chemistry on a field with a drone is quite different than with a regular rig. To start, the drones can only carry about three gallons. With the Rantizo system, you can apply about an acre per flight. Micheal describes this as a benefit rather than a bug, meaning this allows growers to make more insightful and precise applications that they couldn’t do with traditional application.


Moving at 15.5 miles per hour, you can cover an acre in roughly two to four minutes. With around 10 minutes of battery life, that means you can typically do two to three flights before needing to recharge. Rantizo contractors are equipped with multiple batteries, charges and generators to keep the application going. “We’ve got the whole workflow set up so you can run pretty much all day,” Michael explained.


Rantizo can apply wherever the application is needed. Specialty crops have especially benefited from this technology.


“An example of economic impact is a crop such as pumpkins,” shared Ken. “Say, for example, if later in the season, you get insect infestation or mildew, you've got some choices to make. You can go in there with the ground rig, but you're going to destroy some plants and you're going to have some economic loss from that. The other choice is to not spray, and you're going to have economic loss on the crop from the pests that are attacking it. Being able to spray for a few hundred dollars can make an impact of well over a thousand dollars per acre.”


Listen to the full conversation on the Precision Points podcast by looking us up in your favorite podcast app or using the player above. If you’re interested in learning more about Rantizo, check out rantizo.com or find them on Twitter – after all, you might just say the sky’s the limit for this company.


Have you used drones for field applications? Leave a review here.




Host: Morgan Seger

Morgan Seger grew up on a small farm in northwest Ohio before studying agriculture at The Ohio State University. She spent 10 years working with ag retail – specifically in ag tech – prior to hosting the Precision Points Podcast. She lives and farms in western Ohio with her husband Ben and their four children. Morgan has her own blog, Heart and Soil, where she talks about her experience farming, gardening, and raising her family.





Guest: Michael Ott


Michael Ott is the founder and CEO of Rantizo, a precision ag technologies company that has developed a turnkey system for using drones to deliver in-field applications when and where they’re needed.

Before Rantizo, Ott worked in corporate venture capital backed by Monsanto, Novozymes and Bunge and invented a patented technology that delivers tiny amounts of nitrogen on a rice seed as it grows. Ott has a master’s degree in chemistry from the University of Iowa and nearly two decades of experience in finance. He is an author on five patent applications and has raised over $150 million in investment over the course of his career.

He resides in Iowa City with his wife Anne, two sons Ryan and Quincy, and daughter Rosalie.



Guest: Ken Rost


Ken Rost is the founder and CEO of Frost Inc., a sprayer manufacturer and precision application technologies provider. Before starting Frost Inc., Ken had a 15-year career with Hypro/Pentair, leaving as the OEM and International Sales Manager. Having worked with OEM and sprayer technologies from around the world, Ken has maintained a keen interest in application technologies and which ones make economic sense. Ken and his family operate a small farm in the Saint Croix River area of Wisconsin and Minnesota.






Transcription:

Host: Morgan Seger

Guests: Michael Ott & Ken Rost


Voiceover:

Welcome to Precision Points, an ag tech podcast, where we plant seeds of innovation to inspire informed decisions about precision technology and its impact for growers like you. We explore precision ag tools and technology from the soil to the sky with your host, Morgan Seger.


Morgan Seger:

Welcome back to Precision Points, an ag tech podcast from precisionagreviews.com. I'm your host Morgan Seger, and in each episode, we strive to bring you unbiased ag tech information and ideas and, today on the show, we're going to be talking about drones. Now this conversation is a little bit different than the drone conversations we've had in the past, because today we're going to be moving away from just imagery and talking about how we can actually make infield applications with drones. So I'm joined by Michael Ott, CEO of Rantizo, and Ken Rost, CEO of Frost Inc., who is a contractor with Rantizo. So we walked through their systems approach to agriculture, how they're integrating all of these different pieces to make the best application in your field, and we get some boots-on-the-ground type information from Ken, who's out there flying these drones and making these applications regularly. So I hope you enjoyed this conversation with Rantizo.


Morgan Seger:

Welcome to the show guys.


Michael Ott:

Thanks for having us.


Ken Rost:

Thanks for having us.


Morgan Seger:

I can't wait to dive in, but before we get into the technology, Michael, could you kick us off by sharing your background with the audience?


Michael Ott:

Yeah. I'm Michael Lott. I'm the CEO of Rantizo. We're a drone spraying company based in Iowa City. Rantizo has a nationwide network of contractors, of which Ken is one. We're currently permitted now in 22 states with over 50 contractors, and Rantizo provides a turnkey drone spraying service, for mostly ag retailers is our channel to market. So it's everything you need to spray with a drone, the drone hardware, software, insurance, support, training, the workflow, everything else that's required there. It's a true system that works and we're operating now all over the place, and this is a really busy time of the year so we're excited for fungicide applications and many more.


Morgan Seger:

Yeah, I'm sure. When did you start Rantizo?


Michael Ott:

So at the beginning of 2018 was the start of it. Went through an accelerator program and we raised some capital from some pretty well-known and good groups and the series A round just last year, we've been growing pretty rapidly ever since. We've got around 30 employees now all across mostly in Iowa City, but we're spread out a little bit.


Morgan Seger:

Gotcha. Very interesting. So, Ken, what about you, could you share your background with us?


Ken Rost:

Sure. I've been involved in spraying and spraying equipment for, well, going on 30 years now. I was fortunate enough to work for a sprayer component company, pumps and valves, components that are used on sprayers all around the world for Hypro Pentair, 15-year career there. I left as the OEM and international sales manager, so I really got to deal with a lot of spray equipment from around the world, and really I've always had a keen interest in cutting edge technologies, finding ways of doing things better and also more economically.


Morgan Seger:

So it makes a lot of sense in that Rantizo’s kind of a natural fit for you. How is this form of spray application, obviously you're off the ground, but how is it different from what you worked with historically?


Ken Rost:

I guess I kind of call it jumping the shark, with a lot of the other opportunity for autonomous equipment and you can do that with tillage equipment. You can do it with planting equipment and probably other equipment. But with application equipment, especially surrounding the licensing that's required by the EPA and each state to be able to operate a vehicle like a drone, really allows us to use some of the technologies that we've been using for a number of years, such as prescription maps and shape file maps to spray only where we need to spray and want to spray and also spray it with variable rate. So, at this platform, and the reason why I was interested in Rantizo's program, is that they had really done their research on all the licensing and all the application equipment that was available to use, and me as a company, or our company, we still manufacture and deal with ground drive equipment. We're always going to have that, but in order to stay on the leading edge of technologies, we also have to understand drone application as well.


Morgan Seger:

Sure. So I love that it's turnkey. And it sounds like, just in your introduction, Michael, you told me way more of what comes with the package than what I thought, right? So the insurance and the licensing and all of those kinds of things, and I have a lot of tactical questions I want to ask you. But before we go there, could you explain this systems approach to agriculture that Rantizo is working on?


Michael Ott:

Yeah. So we really like to look at the whole system and what's needed and really design things that's best for everyone up and down the value chain. So what does the farmer want? What does the ag retailer want? How's the equipment going to fit in there and everything else? You've got to address all of those needs. So if you think, the farmer is ultimately the end customer and they want precise application, right where things are needed when they're needed. So they need fertilizer, but they don't need too much, they don't want too little. You always have to kind of Goldilocks it like right in there. And when you have a system that can go out like a drone and fly in pretty much any weather, you can go be very, very precise with it. So thinking about what that end user needs and then design backwards from there. So that's where we look at that. So then we can take, okay, we want equipment that can fly out at any time.


Michael Ott:

We want multiple units in the field because they're drones and they fly themselves, so why not have more than one? So Rantizo has a swarming permit, so you can actually fly three at a time because the drones handle that, so then you've got equipment that's applying out there. Well then what do you need from an application perspective in terms of the chemical, the fertilizer, whatever that is? Let's make that as optimized as possible by using as little water as you need to get great coverage.


Michael Ott:

So we're working with different chemical companies on that. So you kind of see the whole system from what the farmer needs, what the equipment is going to be, what the chemical input is going to be. And then finally using data to bring all that together. So when you've got a scan of a field saying, all right, in this northeast corner, you've got an insect problem; in the middle of the field you've got a fertilizer deficiency. The standard thing would be to put insecticide and fertilizer and spray the whole field, which that works, it's fine. But then you're spraying fertilizer on insects. You're spraying insecticide where you need a little potassium or nitrogen or whatever the deficiency is. So what we can do is be really precisely targeted just where things are. So when you've got a farmer's needs, the equipment, the right inputs, digital integrations, then you can see how that whole system comes together and works better for everything.


Morgan Seger:

Gotcha. So is the team that you're working with, do they do scouting to do that initial field scan? Or are you using the drones to determine what's going on throughout the field?


Michael Ott:

Yeah. I like to say that we have a promiscuous partnering strategy, that we’ll work with anybody who's out there. So there's many, many imagery and data companies and we're talking to, I think, all of them. So the Terenna, Sentara, Regrow, Climate, you name it, Aerobotics. So we're in commodity crops and specialty crops. Anyone that can get information in a field, that's fantastic. And then they get it in a shape file and we get a shape file to someone like Ken, and then they can go and deploy precisely right from there. So we work with those companies; we don't do the imagery gathering or interpretation or so, but we gather that in and then send that out to our contractor at work. Someone like Ken.


Morgan Seger:

Gotcha. That makes a lot of sense. So then, Ken, once you have that shape file, what is the process like for you?


Ken Rost:

It's quite simple. The controllers for the drones accept those shape files; we basically load them onto the controller. We have a select number of fields that we can click on for the application. There it is with background imagery and everything ready to go. That part of it is really the easy part. Not saying that it was easy to make it happen, but as far as operationally, it's quite simple. The toughest part of taking intelligence from a data company or from a scouting drone flight...say for instance, you're looking for some herbicide-resistant weeds out there and you want to do a spot treatment with the drone. There has to be an intelligence, either artificial or non-artificial, that's going to identify those areas that need to be applied, and that's where I think more development work is continuing. And again, like I said, in the organic intelligence, but then also artificial intelligence, that's going to be able to drill down on those areas. And then it'll just be a quicker process to load those shape files and get the jobs executed.


Morgan Seger:

And I can see how the cleaner and more accurate the data you guys have coming to you is going to make your applications that much more effective. So then, when you're flying Ken, are you using a swarm or do you usually use one or what does this look like when we're out in the field?


Ken Rost:

This is our first year as a contractor with Rantizo and so we're operating one drone; as we get more experienced, we'll get into the swarming. It really kind of depends on the number of acres per hour that you're trying to get to. I'll be honest with you, a lot of the work that we're doing in our area we have a lot of specialty crops, crops like vineyards, strawberry, pumpkin growers, cannabis, hemp-types of crops that are actually more difficult to use a ground rig for, but they aren't your 180-acre row crop, soy and corn. So we're hitting this market with kind of a little bit more of a specialized area. So we're pretty effective with one drone, but yeah, as you're getting into those larger acreages, swarming is going to be more and more effective.


Morgan Seger:

Gotcha. Well, that's interesting. And I could see specialty crops, because they require the repetition of applications throughout the season, being just a no-brainer for something like this. But I'm curious now, if we talk just a little bit more tactically. How long does it take to spray an acre? How much can the drone carry? Things like that.


Michael Ott:

So, the drone right now we have a 10-liter tank in there. So it's just about three gallons. And so you're spraying almost an acre per flight, and that's a feature, not a bug where when you're changing every acre, you can change every acre. So you can say, all right, what's the best thing I can do for this one, the next one, the next one, and go on from there. So I can spray the same thing, that's what everybody else does. And that's perfectly fine, or we can start to tweak what we do on a per acre basis or even smaller units, and then say, okay, this is the best thing I can do for this 60 foot by 200 foot section. This is the best thing I can do for this 380 foot by 40 foot section, whatever it is, and then treat it from there. So we'll do about 14 acres an hour at a three-gallon rate, and that's assuming a flat field that you can get into.


Michael Ott:

As Ken is talking about, you're getting into a curvy nine acres, that's hard to get, we can do that well. We won't be as fast at it, but we'll get there and we'll get great coverage on it.


Morgan Seger:

Yeah. And I think I saw on your website that the battery life is less than 10 minutes. So you're getting across in one flight pretty quick to me; that sounded like that wasn't very much time, but it sounds like you're covering some ground with them.


Michael Ott:

Yeah. So you're flying at 15 and a half miles an hour. You'll cover an acre in two to four minutes. So you'll do probably two to three flights per battery in an optimized situation. And then you'll go out there with multiple batteries, a charger and a generator so you can go out. So you'll have six to 10 batteries per drone, and then a charger that can charge four at a time. So we've got the whole workflow set up so you can run pretty much all day.


Morgan Seger:

Gotcha. And I love that you described it as a feature because I...it's going to challenge us as growers to think about our fields a little bit differently, but it's a huge opportunity to be able to go in and really micromanage those different areas in our field. And when the drones come back to you and you have to reload it and reset it anyway, it's that extra chance to evaluate what you're doing.


Michael Ott:

Exactly. And like, ultimately, I love to go plant by plant. Like, what's the best thing I can do for this one, and that one and the next one, et cetera. And this is a specialty case example, but I thought it was kind of interesting; in pistachios, they'll have a male tree in a five-by-five row. So there's one male tree every 25 plants. And they want to treat that male slightly differently than they do the whole rest of the orchard. So we can come in and hit every 25th tree with a different fertilizing package than what the rest of it gets. So that's an idea that you can't really do that any other way, but there's many, many other things that once you start to have that capability, you like, oh, we can add insecticide to the edge rows. We can skip this in a certain spot, whatever you need to do so you can get really precise with it.


Morgan Seger:

Gotcha. Well, I just learned a lot. I had no idea. Pistachios are not something I'm very familiar with. That's interesting.


Michael Ott:

My favorite part of the job, because we're getting contractors from all over and I love when they come in for training, we just sit and have a beer and like, okay, tell me about the agriculture in your area. So I'm learning about... I'm from Iowa, so I know nothing about wheat fungicide. I knew nothing about pistachios and you know, all these other things. So we get to learn. And it's pretty exciting when you bring all these things in and like, oh, this works super well in hops. How can we apply that to what we're doing in soybeans or vice versa?


Morgan Seger:

Yeah. And your business model is really allowing your customers, whether it's retailers or their growers, to still leverage their local economics and try to figure out what's best and you're just making it easier to make those really tailored applications.


Michael Ott:

Exactly. Like, someone like Ken, we're providing them with marketing content. Once you get licensed to fly and apply, we'll send that out in tweets to a targeted area around exactly where you are. So 50-to-75 mile radius gets a blast. Like, okay, this person is here in the middle of Minnesota, ready to use that drone to apply for you, give them marketing content, everything else that they need to really be successful. And the people that we've found with the most success really take that and then run with it so they can see, okay, this is good marketing content for our area. We need to really focus on the sustainability angle or we really need to focus on the economics or whatever it is for the location that they're in. That's how we find the biggest opportunities being realized.


Morgan Seger:

Yeah, Well, and I think that there is a huge opportunity when you look at sustainability and just in general, you're not going to be spraying as much water. And then you're also not putting things like insecticides in chemistry where it doesn't need to be. Ken, I know that you've talked a lot about economics. How have you seen the economic impact of this type of application influence your growers?


Ken Rost:

An example of economic impact is a crop such as pumpkin. Say, for example, if later in the season, you get insect infestation or mildew, you've got some choices to make. You can go in there with the ground rig, but you're going to destroy some plants and you're going to have some economic loss from that. The other choice is to not spray, and you're going to have economic loss on the crop from the pests that are attacking it. Being able to spray for a few hundred dollars can make an impact of well over a thousand dollars per acre. So that's kind of the way a lot of our first initial customers are looking at things. We're seeing no hesitancy at all on the cost of applications. They just want applications done.


Morgan Seger:

Yeah. They just need it. I mean, otherwise it could destroy their whole crop when you're looking at some of those. So those no-brainer situations are nice to have. And then when it comes to the row crops and things that might be a little bit harder, it's going to take just more of that agronomic brainpower to figure out where you need to be and where you're going to have the biggest impact.


Michael Ott:

I work with micronutrient companies that want, say, a late season boron application on the soybeans that will help you fix that last bit of nitrogen and really pop that yield. Those things are really exciting. And as Ken mentioned, when you have no damage going through the field, if you assume 1% to 2% loss, every pass you make, you've got to get at least three to five kind of to break even, then it changes that economic threshold question from the start.


Morgan Seger:

Yeah. And that actually leads me to one more tactical question I had. So I noticed on the website where it has the drone spraying that you can see downdraft moving the crop around. Does that impact your spray efficacy or the coverage?


Michael Ott:

Yeah. This is a great thing. A question we get often. The quick answer is, the drone is as effective as a tractor, and we've got data showing that done by other people. So the Iowa Soybean Association did a fungicide application on soybeans showing ever so slightly better results from the drone than the tractor. Honestly, not statistically significant, but it was good for us to be at like 69.1 bushels and they were at 67.5. But the takeaway is, yes, it is as effective, if not a little bit better.


Michael Ott:

Syngenta has also done some work showing the same thing. Many others have showed that. And the reason for it is the prop wash doesn't really change the spraying that much, as much as it moves the crop around. So then you get really good coverage down below the canopy, and that really helps with a lot of those systemics that you want to get full coverage up and down. We've got some great videos that you can see showing a fluorescent dye that we sprayed and then came back at night with a black light and you can see in seven foot tall corn in early September, we have phenomenal coverage up and down all the way through the corn crop. So that was, that was excellent.


Morgan Seger:

Yeah, that's exciting because I was actually thinking, in my past career I used water sensitive paper a lot to look at drift retardants and things like that to see what they did. And I was like, I really want to put some of that paper on that corn and just see what it looks like. Cause it does look like it just kind of moves back and forth so you could spray the whole thing. Interesting. Well, is there any, sorry, go ahead, Ken.


Ken Rost:

Well, and with specialty crops too, hemp and cannabis are examples too, they're just a wild plant. I mean, they grow not like row crop. And so getting movement and getting the plants to move, I mean, is a tremendous advantage and you know, there's other types of error assist sprayers available, ground rigs, air blast sprayers. And, for the most part, especially air blast sprayers and vineyard applications, I mean, the drift opportunity and risk is tremendously high because you're blowing droplets at a plant, but you're also blowing droplets past the plant and the prop wash on the drone just directs it to the plant. And that's what we've seen and as you mentioned water semblance of that paper and just really evaluating efficacy, there are tremendous benefits. And I'm guessing that our academia will start to kind of research this a little bit more and hopefully support this type of application.


Michael Ott:

Yeah, we do have a nice paper that got published in the Transaction of the American Society of Ag Biological Engineers, ASABE. And what that paper showed with our Rantizo system, there's no measurable drift downwind when the drone is spraying. And that was compared to a tractor in the exact same situation, which showed a fair amount of drift. It was measurable three to 10 meters down the downwind. Whereas with our drone, it was not, which was among probably the best possible option that we could hope for. And when we were doing that test, I was like, ‘Oh, this looks good.’ You kind of feel good about it, but it's great to have that actual data to show it. And, once again, done by someone else and published in a research journal.


Morgan Seger:

Yeah, for sure. So is there anything else that you think our listeners should know about Rantizo?


Michael Ott:

Yeah. We're looking for partners and we're ready to go nationwide. So I'm trying to find ag retailers that have situations, just like what Ken is doing, where they've invested in systems. They've got something that works a big chunk of the time, but for those use cases that you don't have a good system, the Rantizo drone sprayer is a true turnkey package that can help out with whatever you need. So I like to think of us kind of as a weed whacker, when everyone owns mowers. So we can get those edges, we can get those hard to reach spots. And then as we have more and more drones out there and better use cases, people can figure out ways with us to cover greater amounts of territory with each spray and go towards a wider adoption. We're excited about the growth we've had and look forward to partners that can help us push it even further.


Morgan Seger:

Sure, so if someone's listening and they're interested in learning more, where do you suggest they go?


Michael Ott:

Rantizo.com is our website. You can book services there. You can look into getting information on being a contractor. We have a nationwide salesforce now. We've got four guys all across the country, in Idaho and Nebraska, Indiana and Arkansas. So we've got those sales territories kind of broken up as you would expect, and we can get to just about anywhere. So yeah. Check us out at rantizo.com. You can also see our Twitter @rantizosprays. We have a lot of great things, a lot of good content up there. Ken was just posted on the other day where they were talking about, they were using the drone in the field and we get to retweet those. So it's kind of fun seeing what everybody's doing and then share all that information.


Morgan Seger:

Yeah, for sure. So Ken, one question I'd like to ask as we wrap up is if there's one technology that you're most excited about?


Ken Rost:

I get pretty excited about a lot of technology if I feel that they're economically viable. I mean, I see a lot of technology come and go in the application world. I'm excited to see technology such as these identification systems. Any technology that makes the business of spray application more accurate, safer, easier to do, just a better experience for everybody. And working with Rantizo and his drone operations, I've really had a lot of fun doing it. That's the other thing, too. You have to have fun when you're doing something. If you're not having fun, if it's too laborious, you're going to put it off, you're not going to want to do it. With the Rantizo drone program, it's fun. So everyone gets excited about it.


Morgan Seger:

That's awesome. I love it. I mean, you're really making a business out of something that some people consider a toy, right? So this is awesome. It has to be fun. What about you, Michael?


Michael Ott:

I agree with Ken on the fun part. We were just talking, a couple conversations with very, very large ag retailers. And we're always talking about slaying those giants. So then we get a bunch of Beyonce gifs going where it's like slay and the internal chat. We like to have some fun with things. So I do appreciate that. I like it. The thing that's most exciting for me from a technology perspective is those digital integrations. So, when you can really take the imagery, find something that's a problem, treat it, and then verify that it worked.


Michael Ott:

That's a thing that I think is really exciting, and we see a big pull from farmers to do it. Ag retailers are trying to push it out there. A lot of these groups have precision divisions that aren't really capturing all the benefits. They do all this imagery, understand what the situation is, and then they spray the whole field. So it's like, well, we just did a bunch of work to do what we were going to do already. And this is a way for us to say, okay, well, now that we've got all that information, let's use it in the most beneficial way for everyone up and down the value chain.


Morgan Seger:

Yep. I like that a lot. So from Rantizo's perspective, after you finish an application, are you sharing the as-applied map and stuff like that back to the retailer?


Michael Ott:

Yeah. So we're doing right now, coverage maps, and then we're going to work for the fully integrated as-applied. When someone gets us a shape file, we always, like the coverage is the shape file that you gave us. Like, it's always 100% of that every time. And honestly, I would like to just like color it in because that's what it is, but people want to see, and we can pull it out. Like here's the 13 flights that it took to get back and forth and do that. We can see, you know, breaking down each individual one. So I can tell you this one was at 8:32, this one is 8:36, blah, blah, blah. How it goes through the field. So we do have a lot of that and we can also track weather, application data, everything else as it goes through there. So all that verification is really important.


Morgan Seger:

Well, thank you both so much for joining us today. And if anyone listening is interested in learning more, go to Rantizo.com.


Michael Ott:

Thank you.


Morgan Seger:

Thanks.


Morgan Seger:

Thanks for tuning into another episode of Precision Points and a shout out to Rantizo for spending some time walking us through their system and how you can use drones to fly and apply on your fields. I think this technology is really going to push us as growers to study our fields and understand how we can have the highest impact when we're making applications. Since we have the opportunity, or as Michael said, it's a feature that you can spray about three gallons per flight, so every time you're coming back, you can reassess what needs to be going in the tank next. If you're interested in joining as a contractor with Rantizo or you're a grower, and you want to learn more, go to Rantizo.com. For our full show notes, go to precisionagreviews.com. While you're there, check out our grower-sourced reviews. We've created this as a space for growers to come and share their experiences with precision ag technology and services, with the hope that it will make your next decision a little bit easier by having feedback from growers like you. Let's grow together.


Voiceover:

Thanks for tuning into today's episode. To hear more podcasts like this, please rate, review and subscribe to Precision Points. Visit precisionagreviews.com for show notes from this episode and read expert advice on the blog, share your experience with the precision ag products you use and check out our network of farmer reviews. Let's grow together.


57 views0 comments
Search Loading.gif